SWEET SUMMER SWEAT: HotBox Infrared Sauna Studio

 Maxim Shapovalov for DTLA Weekly

Maxim Shapovalov for DTLA Weekly

What’s the best way to cool down this summer? Imagine a place where you can refresh the body, invigorate the spirit and relieve stress and tension. A place where you can boost your immune system, detoxify, calm nerves, clarify skin tone, burn calories, improve sleep, relieve muscle and joint pain, and so much more.

 Maxim Shapovalov for DTLA Weekly

Maxim Shapovalov for DTLA Weekly

Upon entering the HotBox lobby, you are welcomed with industrial chic high-beam ceilings painted bright white for a feel that is more beachy than downtown. Your first step will be the choice of chromotherapy color for your infrared session.  Purple for creativity, yellow to stimulate mental activity, pink to calm the senses, orange for energy, etc.

Waterfall

Waterfall produces the whole range of BOPP-films of the basic and special brands that are in demand among its key customers. In addition to the basic products types, the plant has launched production of a number of unique films that have no analogues in Russia.

Waterfall’s highly professional team has mastered production of complex BOPP films, that are in demand both on the Russian and foreign markets, in record time due to their exceptional skills and the plant’s innovative equipment.

The company’s main goal is to provide the flexible packaging market with high-tech BOPP-film, anticipating expectations of the most demanding customers. We guarantee the best quality in Russia due to the synergy of state-of-the-art innovative equipment and our highly professional team.

Luftgekühlt 4

In the Porsche vernacular, Luftgekühlt represents all the air-cooled cars in the manufacturer’s history, from the Pre-A 356 through the 993 model line, which ended in 1998.

 Porsche Carrera

Porsche Carrera

 Porsche Carrera

Porsche Carrera

 Porsche Speedster

Porsche Speedster

 Porsche Speedster

Porsche Speedster

FlowLab 1

William Jamaal Fort, the founder of FlowLab (and the Flow Training System) has worked in the fields of simulation, entertainment and performance training for the past 20 years.

 Maxim Shapovalov for DTLA Weekly

Maxim Shapovalov for DTLA Weekly

The synthesis of these disciplines has resulted in a therapeutic protocol that helps clients tap their true human potential.

 Maxim Shapovalov for DTLA Weekly

Maxim Shapovalov for DTLA Weekly

FlowLab is poised to create new standards in fields of human performance training and education.

SpaceoutVR

 SpaceoutVR, Inc. is a developer of Mobile VR Apps and an integrated VR content publisher. Spaceout.VR integrates entertainment, gaming and communications into one personalized VR App. Spaceout.VR thrives on the emotional connection between a person, their phone, their networks and their personal media.

 Maxim Shapovalov for DTLA Weekly

Maxim Shapovalov for DTLA Weekly

Imagine a device that can teleport you to fantastic new worlds with just the phone in your pocket. The Spaceout.VR Premium Viewer is comfortable, stylish and affordable.

 Maxim Shapovalov for DTLA Weekly

Maxim Shapovalov for DTLA Weekly

 Maxim Shapovalov for DTLA Weekly

Maxim Shapovalov for DTLA Weekly

Interview to Womankind magazine (Australia)

The latest issue of Womankind magazine is dedicated to Russia. “Into Siberia” is a story about six Arctic expeditions completed by Standartstudio.

THE ARCTIC EXPEDITION TOOK TWO YEARS TO PREPARE, AND THEN SIX EXPEDITIONS FOLLOWED.

It’s windy, stark and the winters are long. Windchill can freeze bare skin in a matter of seconds. But humanity has thrived in these conditions for centuries.

In 2002, photographers Maxim Shapovalov and Slava Schoot began preparations for their first exhibition into the Tundra. Located just below the polar cap, and covering some 20 per cent of the Earth’s surface, the Arctic Tundra is home to nomadic reindeer herders, Nganasan and the Nenets.

Today, preserving the unique culture, dreams, language, myths, and beliefs of the world’s indigenous cultures is as urgent as actions to save our biosphere from pollutants and industrial destruction. While there are almost 6,000 languages spoken in the world today, only half of these languages are being taught to children. Losing another language from the planet means losing its unique human perspective, imagination, spirit, and mode of reality. It shrinks human possibilities to a monoculture.

“As visual ethnologists, our goal is not only to record daily lives of people, but also to create a space for conversation about the value of these cultures to the world - ultimately rising awareness about the fragility of their continued existence,” note the photographers.

Please describe for us everyday life for indigenous Russians...

Maxim Shapovalov: Work, work, work. No weekends or vacations. What would you take a vacation from? Life?

In the subarctic climate, there are no banana trees, so in order to survive humans must follow and look after a flock of reindeer. This animal is perfectly adapted to arctic conditions; they can withstand extreme cold and windy conditions.

Moving after a flock of reindeer is the nomad’s way of life. The reindeer gives them food, shelter, clothing, transportation and life purpose; it means they are self sufficient. The only requirement for the reindeer is yagel (Arctic moss), which protects them from common threats like bee stings. They will cover hundreds of miles in search of it.

The temperature is typically between -20 and -50 degrees Celsius. Indigenous people wear light, comfortable clothes, made out of reindeer skins. The most difficult time is when black purga starts, which is a strong wind, mixed with snow, which normally lasts a few days but can sometimes last weeks.

A Nenets once told us a story about the purga; one day he went out to tighten his sleds to his house and he got lost. He spent three days in a snow cave, and had to dig himself out with his bare hands. When he got out of the cave he found that he was standing just 20 meters from his house.

When did you first know that you were going to be a photographer? Upon discharge from military service in 1989, I attended an exhibit of Helmut Newton in Moscow. I served my duty in the middle of nowhere on the far east of Russia, so my thirst for cultural events was especially great at that time. I fell in love with the pictures, I read the autobiography of the author and realized that photography was what I wanted to do in the future.

Do you think that it is important for photographers to study?          I never went to school to study photography. My previous engineering degree allowed me to educate myself with technical details. When I moved to New York City in 1991 my first job was at a photolab, where I worked for two years. Then I met a great old-school photographer Peter Castellano and became his assistant. I learned how to manage the studio, build sets, and organize photoshoots in the studio and on location. I think it is much more rewarding to learn photography from another professional than spend time in the classroom.

How do you know that a scene will make a good photograph? When I take pictures, I keep in mind a few things. First, if there is something in my frame, it must have a reason. Pictures should be meaningful. I have to be able to explain why I took this picture and why this subject is in my frame. Second, for a successful shot, every part is important. You may have a great subject, but it is important what kind of background you choose. Lighting is just as important. If you’ve got that covered, it is still important to catch the right moment, to bring your picture to life. Third, I double everything. Any piece of my equipment is doubled (except lenses). I always have two camera bodies, at least two sets of lights, multiple cables, filters and so on. I even have a partner who can shoot just as well as me.

The people in your photographs look so natural. They do not look staged. How do you achieve this?

Ever since I picked up a camera, I wanted to learn a photo-technique where I could capture any moment. But by the time I became technical, I lost this spontaneity. My pictures looked very staged and still. It took many years to loosen up and be able to react quickly to any kind of situation. I got enormous help from my partner who has a great sense of style and ability to place the photographing subject in the “given circumstances”, as he call it. Every photograph we take is staged. We remove unnecessary things away from it, bring things that will play out, set the lighting, make sure people look genuine, and then communicate with them, while taking photographs.

 You have taken gorgeous photographs of women collecting berries in the tundra. What do indigenous cultures enjoy that ‘developed’ cultures do not? In other words, what have ‘developed’ cultures lost over centuries of ‘development’?

Every time I visit remote locations and communicate with local people, I feel this strong connection. It’s almost an instinct, which sleeps in urban environments and awakes in the wilderness. It’s like a genetic sense of eternity, which we are all part of. We forget what is it like to live a simple but meaningful life in connection with Mother Earth. I never noticed a sign of depression amongst adults nor ADD amongst children. Kids are busy all day playing outside, no matter the temperature. Adults work from sunrise until sunset and never complain about the amount of work they have to do. A family of ten sleeps in a little shag covered with reindeer skins and never grudge on one another. Not a single person I’ve asked has wanted to relocate from the tundra. “We have here everything we need”, they say. 

Museum and Exhibition Center ‘Worker and Kolkhoz Woman’

The museum and exhibition center opened in September 2010 inside a new basement of a legendary sculpture by Vera Mukhina – ‘Worker and Kolkhoz Woman’. The 24-meter sculpture of Worker and Kolkhoz Woman, a masterpiece of soviet and world modernism of the first half of XX century, was created using new technologies discovered by Russian metallographist, Professor P.N. Lvov.

Today the sculpture is placed on the basement-pavilion created under inspiration of Boris Iofan’s design for Paris exhibition 1937. 

Our photographs hang on walls of the museum and show modern images of Iofan’s buildings in the city. For this project we spent many hours in the Municipal archive, determine whereabouts and current conditions of properties. Final pieces 1,5x2 meters are Archival-rated Crystal Archive Photographic prints.

Silk and metal alloy.

Solstudio Textile Design developed and released six original patterns on silk branded Radical Chic. A series of scarves were dedicated to Norilsk, as part of a large integrated communication program of the 80th anniversary of "Norilsk Nickel".

 Radical Chic + Standartstudio

Radical Chic + Standartstudio

They depict unusual for such an accessory scenes: icebreakers and excavators, the molten metal, ladles and furnace vents. Industrial prints - a rarity in the world of fashion.

 Radical Chic + Standartstudio

Radical Chic + Standartstudio

The first Russian textile design studio SOLSTUDIO TEXTILE DESIGN produces the brand Radical Chic.  Radical Chic is not just a Russian, but Moscow trademark reflecting the dynamic and cosmopolite life of the city.

 Radical Chic + Standartstudio

Radical Chic + Standartstudio

Barton G foie gras

If somehow the news escaped you, foie gras is legal again in California, and many chefs across the city and even all the way down in OC are welcoming the unctuous delicacy with open arms. 

The flamboyant West Hollywood “theatery” crafts a visually stimulating, sweet, and savory soy-marinated and coal-roasted 3 1/2 ounces of Hudson Valley foie gras. Adding to the art direction are accoutrements like squid ink and charcoal sourdough bread resembling charred logs.

 Standartstudio with Wagstaff

Standartstudio with Wagstaff

The Big White Nothing

"We saw a white infinite nothing", Industrial photographers Slava Schoot and Maxim Shapovalov about there journey to the Arctic. What is the best time to travel along the Northern Sea Route, where it is best to wait out the storm, which animals can be seen in the Russian Arctic - the story told by known industrial photographers Slava Schoot and Maxim Shapovalov. They sailed along the NSR on one of the "Norilsk Nickel" ships.

 In the Kara Sea

In the Kara Sea

Slava Schoot:

Spring is the best time to travel by the Northern Sea Route. In summer, it's hot and besides open water there is not much to see. In winter there is the polar night. Fall of often stormy and dangerous. In the spring you can see the northern lights. Nature awakes - you can meet seals, polar bears, and myriad of birds. Day changes in to the night, so sunrises and sunsets are amazing. In the summer and in the winter time of the day doesn't rally change.

We stepped on to a vessel, so called double acting ship. It’s a type of icebreaker designed to run ahead in open water and thin ice, but turn around and proceed astern (backwards) in heavy ice conditions. We sailed the Northern Sea Route in the end of April - right after the reindeer herder’s festival.

 At port of Dudinka

At port of Dudinka

Upon completion of our photo assignment in village of Torch, snowstorm stroke and it was impossible to fly out. We had to persuade the local authorities to spear us TREKOL (all-terrain vehicle). After a rough six-hour drive through tundra in complete blizzard we got to the port. A ship has sailed after an hour after our arrival.

We did not have any other duties on the ship, but photography. We were shown almost the entire ship - from the engine room up to the galley. There was a sauna with the swimming pool, which is filled with seawater. So we swam in the Yenisei, White, Kara and Barents Seas. We have seen how to manage the ship as it breaks the ice. We were surprised that they can manage by one person. On watch has four remote controls, by which the duty may adjust the course and steer through the ice. The ship is equipped with four diesel engines. Their capacity is sufficient to provide enough energy to supply city of Norilsk.

 Atomic Icebreaker "Vaigach".

Atomic Icebreaker "Vaigach".

Captain stopped the ship twice to let us out on the ice to take pictures. According to the captain, for the company "Norilsk Nickel", all these ships are "like a truck, delivering product. Our main priority is to bring the goods to the port. Later or earlier - is not so important, important is that the goods should reach their destination."

We spotted some seals and polar bears. Polar bear is the most dangerous animal in the Arctic. When we left the ship, armed members of the team accompanied us. Another risk factor – ice cracks. We were arguing among themselves, Maxim more risky, he offered to continue taking pictures and I replied: "this image does not worth our lives!"

 Through the ice

Through the ice

Maxim Shapovalov:

The most interesting part of the voyage was passing Dixon, one legendary port. All Arctic expedition started from there. Roald Amundsen, Nikifor Begichev and all known polar explorers visited this old arctic village. As of now, there are more statues of pioneers than living men. Once it was possible to fly to Dixon on the plane directly from Moscow. Dixon - the only port in the Kara Sea, where it is possible to repair an icebreaker. The port is inextricably linked with the Russian nuclear fleet.

Another memorable voyage was along the Yenisei River. On it’s shores you can find about a dozen villages. Our ship made a few stops to unload goods to local residents in exchange for arctic salmon and venison. 

 on Enysey River

on Enysey River

Once we got into the storm. It was not very strong, but it was still scary. It lasted all night long. DAS icebreaking ship is poorly prepared for stormy weather due to spoon-like design. We took refuge in a swimming pool - hiding in the water neutralize rocking of the ship. We were astonished by the open space – it appears as white infinite nothingness. Sometimes the ridges in the spring sunshine acquire azure color. It almost looked like Caribbean Sea.

A great impression on us made a meeting with the icebreaker "Vaigach" (atomic icebreaker). He walked a collision course. We moved to the side and missed it. There was a feeling that we are all in out of space - there was nothing around, only two of our ship, two capsules in the darkness. Only the crackle of breaking ice and vibration of the ship remained real. 

 Storm in Kara Sea

Storm in Kara Sea

Our trip took six days, which was normal for this time of year. In heavy ice conditions it may last up to ten days. 

The art-project “13+. Nanotechnologies: Visual Experiments”

The art-project “13+. Nanotechnologies: Visual Experiments” will open in Moscow Polytechnic Museum on November 15, innovation and venture news source UNOVA reports.

The exposition presents the photo project “Building New Industry”. This is a portrait of new industry, created by photo artists Maxim Shapovalov and Vladislav Shoot. With their cameras, they examined nanotechnological plants, launched in 2011.

The number 13 in the name of the project reportedly symbolizes 13 nano-industry plants that is open with participation of RUSNANO.

The art-project “13+. Nanotechnologies: Visual Experiments” is one of the first attempts to formulate a new figural language and turn objects of new industry into subjects of new aesthetics.

CURiBOT Audio Encyclopedia

 Visionary and producer of infamous “Masha and the Bear” created new educational application for children cartoon series. In collaboration we created visual content to accompany application's presentation. 

CURiBOT Audio Encyclopedia series is a new kind of entertainment for kids that builds a systematic scientific knowledge base via informative audio plays full of adventures, humor and music.

The series consists of hour-long audio episodes where main characters - Professor, robot Q and cat Alberta - discuss topics of science and culture in as they travel through space and time.

CURiBOT encyclopedia is excellent way to entertain kids while they work on art projects or on long drives!